Cooking Methods

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How To Cook What You Purchased:

Anyone can become a great home chef with Prime Time Butcher as you guide. Once you master the fundamentals, preparation is easy.

Our step-by-step guide will suggest cooking equipment and general cooking instructions. For specific recipes, please consult your favorite recipes.

Contents:

 

BRAISING

Braising is a combination cooking method that sears food in a frying or roasting pan. It produces a savory liquid because flavors extracted from the food become concentrated during a slow cooking process. Braised foods are always served with a liquid or gravy that has been refined by straining, thickening or seasoning. Final braised products are characteristically tender, moist and rich.

Cooking Equipment

Choose an oven safe pan with a tight lid that fits the size of your meat selection. Do not use pans that have wooden or plastic handles because high oven temperatures will melt or burn them.

Step 1

Select you cut, liberally season the meat with salt, pepper, Prime Time Butcher rubs or any other seasonings you prefer. (Be careful not to over season with salt). Dust meat/poultry with flour to help with both browning process and the thickening of the liquid. Flour helps meat brown in the pan and thickens the liquid used to cook the meat.

Dice or cut carrots, onions, celery, aromatic herbs, (rosemary, parsley, thyme, etc.) and any other like ingredients you favor.

Step 2

Heat the pot. Add a small amount of oil to brown the meat/poultry all sides.

Higher heat tends to produces better browning, but also tends to burn quickly. Medium heat is a good alternative but will require additional time.

Step 3

Remove meat and add any diced/cut vegetables, herbs or selected ingredients to the oil that remains in the pan. Sautee until caramelized. If you want to deglaze your pan go to Step 4A, if not, continue to Step 5.

Step 3A

To deglaze, remove the cooked vegetables from the pan and any excess fat that has accumulated while browning the meat.

In deglazing, add approximately 1-2 ounces of wine, alcohol or other liquid depending on size of pan. When you deglaze, you want to remove the accumulated sediment at the bottom of the pan with a spoon. If you use alcohol, make sure that it completely evaporates.

Step 4

Return meat to the pan and add enough liquid to cover it one-third of the way. (Use beer, wine, stock or a sauce. Sauce may be acid based such as ketchup or citrus juice). Cover pan and cook at approximately 350 °. Cooking time depends upon thickness of cut and type of meat. Turn meat periodically to ensure proper cooking. Your goal is to braise until your dish is fork tender.

Step 5

When serving your braised meat pour the liquid over the cut. If the liquid needs more flavor, strain it into a sauce pan, bring to a simmer and adjust seasonings. A common way to adjust the flavor of the liquid can be achieved by simmering slowly or reducing it by adding butter, cream or a roux (a mixture of butter and flour cooked until bubbly).

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Braising and stewing are similar in nature. See chart below for a comparison of the two cooking methods.

Differences between Braising and Stewing

Braising Stewing
Large, firm cuts of meat are usually braised. Firm cuts of meat are often cubed.
The cooking liquid covers the food by two-thirds The cooking liquid covers the food completely.
The cooking liquid is composed of wine, stock, or sauce and may contain an acid. The cooking liquid is made up of primarily of natural juices from the food product but may also contain wine, stock, sauce or an acid.
The cooking process of the large cuts of meat/food most commonly cooked in the oven, where the heat is indirect. The cooking process of the small cuts of meat is most commonly cooked on the stove top where the direct heat is appropriate.
Braised foods, such as meats, many require carving before serving. Stews may be served “right out of the pot” and generally require no slicing for serving.
The cooking liquid requires adjustments by straining, seasoning and thickening. The cooking liquid is seasoned and served “right out of the pot.”

Source: John & Wales University College of Culinary Arts. Culinary Fundamentals. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 2001.

STEWING

Stewing is a version of braising that allows you to cook a meal in one pot. This combination cooking method begins with searing the meat and ingredients and totally submerging them in a liquid while slowly cooking. This long process deeply tenderizes and infuses the meat, vegetable and liquid with an intensely rich flavor. Serve stew with the liquid it was cooked in.

Cooking Equipment Needed: A tightly lidded pot that is large enough to fit your meat/poultry/vegetables and enough liquid for submersion.

Step 1

Select you cut, liberally season the meat with salt, pepper, Prime Time Butcher rubs or any other seasonings you prefer. (Be careful not to over season with salt). Dust meat/poultry with flour to help with both browning process and the thickening of the liquid. Flour helps meat brown in the pan and thickens the liquid used to cook the meat.

Dice or cut carrots, onions, celery, aromatic herbs, (rosemary, parsley, thyme, etc.) and any other like ingredients you prefer.

Step 2

Heat the pot. Add a small amount of oil to brown the meat/poultry on all sides.

Higher heat tends to produces better browning but also tends to burn quickly. Medium heat a good alternative but will require additional time.

Step 3

Remove the meat/poultry. Add oil, vegetables/herbs and sauté until they are caramelized. Once the vegetables are slightly cooked, remove and reserve for later.

If you want to deglaze pan go to Step 3A, if not continue to Step 4.

Step 3A

To deglaze, remove the cooked vegetables from the pan and any excess fat that has accumulated while browning the meat.

In deglazing, you need to add approximately 1-2 ounces of wine, alcohol or other liquid depending on size of pan. When you deglaze, you want to remove the accumulated sediment at the bottom of the pan with a spoon. If you use alcohol, make sure that it is completely burned off.

Step 4

Return the meat/poultry to the pot and add enough liquid to submerge your ingredients. (Use either stock, wine, beer or your favorite liquid). In addition, add a bouquet garni or seasonings tied in a cheese cloth.

Bring the mixture to a simmer, cover the pot and cook on the stovetop for 45 minutes to 2 hours or as long as your recipe calls for. Cook this mixture very slowly. Turning the heat up will not make the stew cook faster. Your goal is to stew until your dish is fork tender.

Add your vegetables back to the liquid after approximately one-third of the cooking time has elapsed. Vegetable cook time will vary depending on how large your selections are cut.

Step 5

Your stew is done when a fork slides in and out of the meat without resistance. If your stew is not thick enough simmer the stew further without a cover until it thickens more. Check thickening by dipping a spoon into the pot. When the liquid coats the back of the spoon your stew is finished.

If your stew ingredients are becoming soft, remove meat and vegetable and thicken sauce independently.

Step 6

Serve and enjoy

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Braising and stewing are similar in nature. See chart below for a comparison of the two cooking methods.

Differences between Braising and Stewing

Braising Stewing
Large, firm cuts of meat are usually braised. Firm cuts of meat are often cubed.
The cooking liquid covers the food by two-thirds The cooking liquid covers the food completely.
The cooking liquid is composed of wine, stock, or sauce and may contain an acid. The cooking liquid is made up of primarily of natural juices from the food product but may also contain wine, stock, sauce or an acid.
The cooking process of the large cuts of meat/food most commonly cooked in the oven, where the heat is indirect. The cooking process of the small cuts of meat is most commonly cooked on the stove top where the direct heat is appropriate.
Braised foods, such as meats, many require carving before serving. Stews may be served “right out of the pot” and generally require no slicing for serving.
The cooking liquid requires adjustments by straining, seasoning and thickening. The cooking liquid is seasoned and served “right out of the pot.”

Source: John & Wales University College of Culinary Arts. Culinary Fundamentals. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 2001.

Source: John & Wales University College of Culinary Arts. Culinary Fundamentals. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 2001.

BROILING MEAT

Considered as an alternative to outdoor barbequing, broiling is a dry heat cooking method where heat is emitted from the top. The direct heat of broiling creates an outstanding char and savory caramelized crust that resembles grilling. Brushing the piece of meat with either herb butter or flavored oil boosts the flavor.

Cooking Equipment Needed: A broiling pan that will allow excess juices to drain, thus alleviating the possibility of a flare-up.

Step 1

Preheat your broiler until it reaches maximum temperature.

Line the broiler pan as well as the catch bin with aluminum foil for easy of cleaning. Poke holes in the top foil with a fork to allow juice to drain into the catch pan.

Adjust the distance of the rack to the heating element. A 1-2 inch piece of meat should be approximately 3-4 inches away from a heat source and a 3 inch or larger cut of meat should be approximately 5-8 inches away from the heat source. Vary these measurements a few inches depending on the configuration of your oven.

Step 2

To prevent flare-ups trim any extra fat off meat. To season the meat, thinly coat it with a small amount of oil or melted butter, sprinkle with PrimeTineButcher.com rubs or your own selection of spices. Using generous amounts of salt tends to dry the meat by drawing out the juices.

Step 3

Place the meat in the broiler for 10-14 minutes per inch of thickness total. For thicker cuts, first broil meat further from the heat source and then decrease the distance to brown and finish meat.

Cook meat approximately 10 minutes for a rare one inch steak. Total cooking time will increase with desired doneness (medium-rare, medium and well-done). Always cook meat longer on the first side than the second.

Use a meat thermometer to determine desired doneness. Internal temperatures for Veal, Beef and Lamb are as follows: rare is approximately 125°; medium rare is approximately 135°; medium is approximately 140° and well-done is anything beyond 145°. If you are cooking Pork, the internal temperate should read approximately 150°.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. The USDA suggests cooking whole cuts of meat to Medium (145°) with a three-minute rest time. The recommended cooking TEMPERATURE FOR ground meats IS to well done (160°) and doesn’t require any rest time.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

BROILING POULTRY

We do not recommend broiling poultry. This method chars the outside and may not fully cook the chicken to doneness.

To cook chicken parts we recommend baking your chicken first for approximately 20 minutes at 350º and finishing it under the broiler to achieve a charred outside crust. (See Grilling Poultry for more information).

Using an instant read thermometer, the internal temperature should read approximately 160°.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDED INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. THE USDA RECOMMENDS POULTRY SHOULD BE COOKED TO 165°.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

DEEP-FRYING

Deep-frying is a dry cooking technique that seals the outside of food through immersion in pre-heated fat or oil at temperatures ranging between 350° - 375°. If oil is not hot enough, food will absorb it and taste greasy. If oil is too hot, food will burn on the outside before it is fully cooked on the inside

Most deep fried foods are coated with batter or breading before frying to give food an enhanced texture, flavor and appearance.

Cooking Equipment Needed: Either an electric or gas deep-fryer or a large pot with a heavy bottom. A deep fry thermometer and a wire-mesh skimmer or tongs are also necessary.

Step 1

Select your fat or oil. PrimeTimeBucther.com recommends using non-hydrogenated soybean oil that contains no trans-fatty acids. Vegetable or corn oil may also be used.

Step 2

Fill your pan with enough oil to cover the largest pieces. (This will be approximately 6-12 inches of oil). Pre-heat oil over a medium flame until thermometer reaches temperatures between 350° - 375°.

Step 3

While your oil is heating, prep meat either by battering or breading.

When you batter a food product you create a “semi-liquid” mixture that contains flour, milk and eggs. Batter the product immediately before you fry your food.

To bread a food product, follow this four-step process known as the standard breading procedure.

  1. Prep your food product to size.
  2. Dredge your product in seasoned or unseasoned dry flour. Dredging requires dipping the product into the flour, coating it evenly on all surfaces and shaking off the excess. Avoid dredging foods in advance since this will cause the dry flour to become pasty.
  3. Dip the flour-dredged food product into an egg wash or other wet liquid until completely coated.
  4. Immediately dust the egg washed food in any type of dry crumbs or flour. PrimeTimeButcher.com recommends either breadcrumbs or seasoned flour but ground nuts, cereal, crackers and shredded fruits can be used as well.

Step 4

Once oil is heated to ideal temperature, place the product in pan with tongs. Cook, turning occasionally. Using a quick read thermometer make sure that cooked poultry reads at least 160° and cooked meats reach at least 130-135°.

Remove product from oil with tongs or a wire mesh skimmer and place on paper towel to drain. Before adding more raw product to oil in pan, be sure the temperature of the oil returns to 350°-375°. If additional seasoning is needed, season on the draining surface rather than over the pan.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. The USDA suggests cooking whole cuts of meat to Medium (145°) with a three-minute rest time. The recommended cooking TEMPERATURE FOR ground meats IS to well done (160°) and doesn’t require any rest time.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Step 5

Serve and enjoy! Fried foods are best when served immediately. You can also hold these products in a hot oven for a short time or reheat on a cookie sheet at 350° for 12-14 minutes.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

GRILLING MEAT

Grilling is a method of cooking food on a “gridlike” surface that sits above a heat source containing red glowing charcoal, an electric heat source, smoky seasoned wood chips or a gas flame. This dry method of cooking is ideal for tender foods that cook relatively quickly.

Grilling or barbequing over an open flame is one of the oldest and easiest ways to cook food. This method sears the meat with an incredible crust and can also infuse it with a smoky char and flavor.

Cooking Equipment Needed: An electric, gas, or charcoal grill (using charcoal or wood chips), long handled tongs, oven mitts and an instant read thermometer.

Step 1 - For charcoal grills. (For gas grills, see Step 3).

Remove cooking grate. Line the bottom of the grill with paper or kindling over the charcoal grate. Stack the charcoal in a pyramid shape, soak with charcoal lighter fluid and ignite. (Fluid soaked charcoal is also available). Please use caution when igniting grill.

Step 2

Wait until the charcoal turns completely gray and glows orange (pre-heating takes approximately 20-30 minutes). Once gray and glowing protect your hands with oven mitts before using utensil to spread charcoal over the bottom of grill grate. Replace cooking grate.

Step 3 (Gas Grill)

Gas grills should be pre-heated for approximately 20-30 minutes before cooking.

Step 4

We suggest lightly oiling the cooking grate to prevent food from sticking. Place your marinated, dry-rubbed, seasoned or plain meat on the grate.

Step 5

Grill your piece of meat, turning it once. Cooking times are available for review on item product pages.

Turn meat to second side when it no longer sticks to the grate. Doneness is determined by using an instant read thermometer.

Temperatures for Beef, Veal and Lamb are: rare, approximately 125°; medium rare, approximately 135°; medium, approximately 140° and well done, approximately 145° - 150°. Pork should be cooked to 150°. Use of an instant read thermometer prevents overcooking.

Depending on size of cut, let meat rest 4-10 minutes to hold in juices before slicing and serving.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. The USDA suggests cooking whole cuts of meat to Medium (145°) with a three-minute rest time. The recommended cooking TEMPERATURE FOR ground meats IS to well done (160°) and doesn’t require any rest time.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

GRILLING POULTRY

Grilling is a method of cooking food on a “gridlike” surface that sits above a heat source containing red glowing charcoal, an electric heat source, smoky seasoned wood chips or a gas flame. This dry method of cooking is ideal for tender foods that cook relatively quickly.

Grilling or barbequing over an open flame is one of the oldest and easiest ways to cook food. This method sears the meat with an incredible crust and can also infuse it with a smoky char and flavor.

Cooking Equipment Needed: An electric, gas, or charcoal grill (using charcoal or wood chips), long handled tongs, oven mitts and an instant read thermometer.

Step 1 - For charcoal grills. (For gas grills, see Step 3).

Remove cooking grate. Line the bottom of the grill with paper or kindling over the charcoal grate. Stack the charcoal in a pyramid shape, soak with charcoal lighter fluid and ignite. (Fluid soaked charcoal is also available). Please use caution when igniting grill.

Step 2

Wait until the charcoal turns completely gray and glows orange (pre-heating takes approximately 20-30 minutes). Once gray and glowing protect your hands with oven mitts before using utensil to spread charcoal over the bottom of grill grate. Replace cooking grate.

Step 3 (Gas Grill)

Gas grills should be pre-heated for approximately 20-30 minutes before cooking.

Cooking Plan:

  • To pre-cook your chicken and finish it on the grill, see Step 4.
  • To fully cook a bone-in chicken on the grill, see Step 5.
  • If you are cooking boneless chicken completely on the grill, see Step 6.

Step 4 – Pre-cooking Bone-in Chicken Parts

Option: Lightly oil the cooking grate to prevent food from sticking.

To par-bake your chicken parts with a marinade or dry rub, cook in oven for approximately 18-20 minutes at 350°. Directly place chicken from oven skin side down on hot grill cooking grate until chicken is fully cooked. Turn chicken once during the 12-15 minute period. Cook chicken longer on first side than second side. Use an instant read thermometer to make sure its internal temperature reaches at least 160°.

Step 5 – Cooking Bone-in Chicken Completely on the Grill

Option: Lightly oil the cooking grate to prevent food from sticking.

Methods for grilling bone-in chicken parts:

1. Recommended method for charcoal grills: Once charcoal is pre-heated, divide it in half, creating a medium heat side and a cooler side.

Place chicken on cooking grate skin side down. Cook raw chicken for approximately 18-20 minutes on medium heat, turning it once. For second side, switch chicken to the cooler area and cook for approximately 14-16 minutes. Check internal temperature with an instant read thermometer. Chicken is usually fully cooked when temperature reaches 160°.

2. Recommended method for gas grills: Using grill controls, divide cooking areas into low and medium heat. Place raw chicken skin side down on the medium heat side of cooking grate. Cook for approximately 30-35 minutes or until the instant read thermometer reaches approximately 160°. If your chicken is not charred to your liking, turn grill to high for 3-4 minutes for a quick char.

Step 6 - Cooking Boneless Chicken

Option: Lightly oil the cooking grate to prevent food from sticking.

Thin Chicken Cutlets: Turn grill down to medium. Place marinated or dry rubbed chicken cutlets on cooking grate. Turn cutlets to second side when a small area of pink remains in the middle of the culet. Depending upon the thickness of the cutlet, every ¼ inch should take approximately 4-6 minutes to cook. To check for doneness, slice into the middle of chicken to check that it is uniformly white in color.

Thick Chicken Breasts: Turn grill down to low-medium heat. Place chicken on the cooking grate and cook for approximately 18-20 minutes for a one-inch chicken breast. Turn each breast once while cooking. Cook the first side longer than the second side. Check temperature an instant read thermometer. The internal temperature should read approximately 160°.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDED INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. THE USDA RECOMMENDS POULTRY SHOULD BE COOKED TO 165°.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

ROASTING MEAT

Roasting is a dry heat cooking technique in a closed environment. It is an easy method that involves placing meat in a roasting pan on a rack in a preheated oven. Roasting is well suited for larger well-marbled roasts, whole poultry, fish or game.

Some chefs recommend searing the outside of food products before roasting to lock in natural juices. If you choose to sear your product, place it in a pan on high heat while browning all sides evenly or in a very hot oven for 15-20 minutes until golden brown.

However, searing is not always necessary. Searing involves experience and technique. If done improperly, searing may burn rather than seal the outside of your entrée.

Barding and Larding

Barding and Larding are two techniques that help lean food retain their flavor and moisture during roasting.

Barding is wrapping lean meat with a fat, (commonly bacon or beef fat), and roasting the combo. You may select to retain or remove the fat 5-10 minutes before the meat is taken from the oven to allow the meat to brown.

Note: All Prime Time Butcher roasts, (excluding pork), arrive with beef fat wrapped around it and tied with butcher twine.

Larding consists of inserting long strips of fat or vegetables into the center of a piece of lean meat to add moisture and eye appeal.

Cooking Equipment Needed: Roasting pan with a wire rack and an instant read meat thermometer.

Tip: If you don’t own a roasting rack, use peeled carrots, celery and onions as a base to lift the product off the pan. Generally, roasting products are cooked uncovered unless meat begins to turn too dark in color.

Step 1

Preheat oven to 400°.

Step 2

Place meat on rack in roasting pan with a small amount of liquid (preferably stock, wine or beer). Add diced carrots, celery and onions (more onions create more natural gravy). Lightly rub the meat with a small amount of oil and top with Prime Time Butcher rubs or other preferred herb and spices. It is desirable to bring product to room temperature before placing in oven to ensure proper cooking time and temperature.

Tip: Additional salt has a tendency to draw out juices and dry food. Salt your entrée after it is sliced or plated.

Step 3

Lower temperature to 350° and place roast on rack in oven. Cook to desired doneness. Allow approximately 18-20 minutes per pound for medium. Adjust times to size by adding or subtracting approximately 5-minute increments for rare, medium rare and well. Consult your item’s product page for further instructions.

Temperatures for Beef, Veal and Lamb are: rare, approximately 125°; medium rare, approximately 135°; medium, approximately 140° and well done, approximately 145° - 150°. Pork should be cooked to 150°. Use of an instant read thermometer prevents overcooking.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDATIONS FOR INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. The USDA suggests cooking whole cuts of meat to Medium (145°) with a three-minute rest time. The recommended cooking TEMPERATURE FOR ground meats IS to well done (160°) and doesn’t require any rest time.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Step 4

Remove meat from pan. Depending on size of cut, let meat rest approximately 4-10 minutes to hold in juices before slicing and serving. Allow the ingredients to remain in the pan to infuse their flavors. Reduce liquid by adding butter, cream, wine or a roux, (a mixture of butter and flour cooked until bubbly), to intensify flavor and taste.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

ROASTING POULTRY

Roasting is a dry heat cooking technique in a closed environment. It is an easy technique that involves placing poultry in a roasting pan on a rack in a preheated oven. Select either whole poultry or poultry parts. This method creates a poultry entrée with juicy, tender white and dark meat as well as a well-browned crusty exterior.

Cooking Equipment Needed: Roasting pan with a wire rack and an instant read thermometer.

Tip: If you don’t own a roasting rack, use peeled carrots, celery and onions as a base to lift the product off the pan. Generally, roasting products are cooked uncovered unless poultry begins to turn too dark in color.

Step 1

Preheat the oven to 400°.

You can use either whole poultry or poultry parts. When cooking whole poultry, truss or tie the legs with twine for a neater presentation. Rub inside and out with oil, butter or citrus or a combination of all three. Sprinkle generously, again inside and out, with either Prime Time Butcher rubs or other preferred herbs and spices. Salt and pepper may be added if desired.

Step 2

Place poultry on a wire rack in a roasting pan with a small amount of liquid on the bottom of the pan. Add diced carrots, onions, celery and chicken stock.

Step 3

Place poultry in preheated oven and turn temperature down to 350°. A 3-4 pound bird will take approximately 1½ hours to cook. To ensure that your poultry is completely cooked and to gauge your progress, utilize an instant read thermometer. For whole birds insert thermometer in the leg joint without touching any bones. For poultry parts, locate the thickest area for temperature check. Temperatures should read no less than160 °.

PLEASE NOTE: THE ABOVE ARE OUR RECOMMENDED INTERNAL COOKING TEMPERATURES. THE USDA RECOMMENDS POULTRY SHOULD BE COOKED TO 165°.

FOR MORE USDA INFORMATION VISIT:

https://www.fsis.usda.gov/.../ct_index

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Step 4

Remove the poultry from the pan at indicated temperature. If you have selected to cook an entire bird, let it rest for 8-10 minutes before carving.

Step 5

With bird removed, create a gravy with drippings and vegetables. Reduce the liquid by adding butter, wine, cream or a roux, (a mixture of butter and flour, cooked until bubbly), to intensify the flavor and taste.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Sautéing

Sautéing is a dry-cooking technique that cooks or reheats food quickly in a shallow pan with a small amount of fat or oil. The pan must be kept in frequent motion to alleviate overbrowning. The heat source must be high and the pan hot enough to sear the food. This process is quick and results in crisp, moist food.

Cooking equipment needed: A good quality large regular or non-stick sauté pan or a cast iron skillet.

Step 1

Place pan over a flame and add a small amount of oil to your meat or poultry. (A cast iron skillet requires additional oil or butter). It is important to preheat pan over high heat before fat or oil is added. Oil should be hot enough to reach its smoking point without burning. A product cooked in oil that is not hot enough will absorb the fat/oil.

Sprinkle meat or poultry with selected seasonings. Suggestions: dip in flour for Marsala or dip in egg and breadcrumbs for a sautéed Piccata or Parmesan cutlet. Consult a specific recipe for more detailed instructions.

Step 2

Add food product to hot pan. Take care to position the meat or poultry in the pan so it is spread out in a single layer.

Cook the product at high temperature. Flip only once to initially seal flavors and achieve a golden brown crust. Turn your skillet down to medium to allow for even cooking. Check to determine if you need to add more clarified butter or oil to the skillet.

Step 3

For a quick impromptu sauce, deglaze pan with stock, wine or a favorite liquid.

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Stir-frying

Stir-frying is a popular, simple Asian cooking technique that employs a wok instead of a sauté pan. It enables you to create fast, healthy dishes that are delightful in appearance and taste. With most stir-fry dishes, vegetables and meat are cubed, thinly sliced or shredded and then quickly cooked in a pan with a small amount of oil at extremely high heat. Because of the metallic composition and shape, the wok’s potential heat intensity and cooking surface is much greater than that a sauté pan and requires constant movement of the food. Woks can also be used to steam, boil, poach, deep-fry or shallow-fry.

Cooking equipment needed: A seasoned flat bottom wok or a heavy regular or non-stick skillet, a small stockpot, tongs, spatula or a spoon.

Step 1

Boil enough water in a small stockpot to blanch vegetables.

Step 2

Cut vegetables into thin, strips or bite-sized pieces. Once the water boils, add vegetables and cook until almost tender. Remove vegetables from water, cool and reserve.

Step 3

Add minced, sliced or chopped ginger, garlic, and/or scallions. Cook quickly until you perceive the scent of your added ingredient.

Step 4

Add meat or poultry to wok or skillet and stir continuously until almost completely cooked. Add blanched vegetables to pan.

Suggestion:

To make a simple sauce, add sesame oil, soy sauce, chicken broth and a small amount of cornstarch and water mix. This usually consists of 1 teaspoon of cornstarch mixed with 2 tablespoons of water. Add more as needed.

Prime Time Butcher also offers three ready-made Asian style sauces: Orange Ginger, General Tso or Garlic Sauce.

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

Cooking times are available for review on item product pages. For questions or further information, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Marinades and Dry Rubs

Marinades and dry rubs can intensify the flavor of your food products. Many marinades contain citrus juice, wine or vinegar as well soy sauce mixed with other sweet ingredients. Dry rubs are a mixture of herbs and seasonings that will also intensity the flavor of your entrées.

Marinades and rubs should be applied to products before they are cooked so they can seep below the surface and be absorbed.

Marinades

To create a marinade combine herbs, spices, oils, pepper and salt with liquids such as beer, wine, stock, soy sauce, etc. Use salt sparingly because it may draw juices out and result in a dry cooked cut.

Use approximately ½ -1 cup of marinade per pound of product. Use non-reactive containers for mixing such as glass or stainless steel.

A marinade should add flavor but not overpower the taste of the entrée. It is natural for a product brushed in an acidic marinade to change color.

Marinating Times:

Thinner cuts, marinate approximately 4-7 hours.

Thicker cuts marinate approximately 10-12 hours.

Marinades and rubs only flavor the surface of the meat. If you want the marinade to penetrate the product cut small slits in the surface. If your product is not completely submerged in marinade it should be turned frequently to ensure even absorption.

Use marinades as a liquid for braising or basting meats and poultry for the broiler or grill. Always boil the marinade before brushing it on meat or poultry. Another option is to set aside a part of your unused marinade and use it for basting later on.

When you add marinated meat or poultry to a cooking surface drip-dry it for a few seconds to prevent fare-ups and charring.

Dry Rubs

PrimeTimeButcher.com offers pre-mixed rubs for you to try… just select them when you purchase your product.

If you prefer to mix your own, combine ground spices, seasoning and herbs. Whatever rub you utilize, apply it sparingly because most often a little goes a long way. Adding a small amount of oil will help a dry rub stick to your product.

If you have any questions or need further instructions, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Making Your Own Stock

Stock is a flavorful liquid that is created when you slowly simmer bones, vegetables and herbs. It’s a great substitute for water in recipes because water adds no taste. Stock is often a major ingredient in well-made soups, sauces and stews.

Cooking equipment needed: A medium to large stock pot, a ladle, cheese cloth and twine.

Cut bones and vegetables roughly. Basic vegetables include carrots, celery and onions. Wash vegetables before use. For a browner stock wash and add onion skins and carrot peels to mixture.

For Beef, Veal and Pork Stock:

  • Evenly spread bones and vegetables on a baking sheet with a small amount of oil. For browner stock, brush above with tomato paste.
  • Roast the above in a preheated 450° oven until they are well browned. The ingredients may need to be turned several times. Note: bones may take longer to cook than vegetables.
  • Add ingredients to pot and fill with cold water until all is submerged. Cold water is necessary because warm water may produce a cloudy stock.
  • Bring liquid to a boil. Reduce heat to obtain a slow simmer to prevent evaporation. Slowly simmer Beef Stock for 10-12 hours and Veal or Pork Stock for approximately 8 hours. Skim off any foam on surface.
  • Option: when approximately 2-3 cooking hours remain tie fresh herbs in a cheesecloth pouch and place in pot.
  • Strain stock and chill overnight. Skim any fat off the top and discard. Stocks will last several days in the refrigerator or will maintain their integrity in the freezer.

For Chicken or Turkey Stock:

  • Add ingredients to pot and fill with cold water until all is submerged. Cold water is necessary because warm water may produce a cloudy stock.
  • Bring liquid to a boil. Reduce heat to obtain a slow simmer and prevent evaporation. Simmer for approximately 3-4 ½ hours or more. The longer you cook stock, the richer and more flavorful it will become.
  • Check water level every 30-45 minutes to see if ingredients are submerged. If they are not covered add more cold water to bring up the liquid level. Skim any bubbles off the surface.
  • Option: When approximately 1-1 ¼ cooking hours remain tie fresh herbs in a cheesecloth pouch and place in pot.
  • Strain the stock and chill overnight. Skim fat off top and discard. Stocks will last several days in the refrigerator or will maintain their integrity in the freezer.

Safe Handling Instructions

This product was prepared from inspected and passed meat and/or poultry. Some food products may contain bacteria that could cause illness if the product is mishandled or cooked improperly. For your protection, follow these safe handling instructions.

  • Keep refrigerated or frozen. Thaw in refrigerator or microwave.
  • Keep raw meat and poultry separate from other foods. Wash working surfaces (including cutting boards), utensils, and hands after touching raw meat or poultry.
  • Cook thoroughly.
  • Keep hot foods hot. Refrigerate leftovers immediately or discard.

If you have any questions or need further instructions, contact us at [email protected] or call 516-921-6519.

Storing Raw Meat & Poultry

Thawed meat/poultry must be kept cold (approximately 35° to 38 °). Many household refrigerators may not maintain an even temperature. Prime Time Butcher recommends storing products on shelf backs. (see chart below for storage times).

All meat and poultry will arrive vacuum-sealed. Vacuum sealing and proper freezing prevents freezer burn and acts as a barrier for dehydration and ice crystals.

The USDA recommends that products should be cooked or frozen according to the time periods listed below. Note: To maintain optimal taste and freshness, do not re-freeze raw products.

Time Food Will Last Once Thawed Out

Product Storage Time
Poultry 1-2 Days
Beef, Veal, Pork, Lamb 3-5 Days
Ground Meat/Poultry 1-2 Days

Please consult the USDA Food Safety Website for a more complete list of items and storage times.

Storing Cooked Meat

After a product is cooked it will last 1-3 days in the refrigerator. Note: Some recipes get better with age. For example, a reheated brisket becomes more tender than when first potted and cooked.

Cooked items can be refrozen and are safe to eat. The “old wives tale” that you can’t refreeze cooked items is actually a myth.

Freezing

Store product in original vacuum-sealed bag or re-wrap in freezer paper or plastic wrap/bag to maintain optimal condition. Place items in freezer toward the back of the shelf or basket. If products sit by the freezer door, they may be exposed to uneven temperatures that may cause thawing and ice crystals.

Products received original vacuum-sealed packaging may be stored in the freezer for approximately 3-4 months. When self-wrapping for freezing, always encase products in plastic wrap first, then insert into a plastic bag and press all of the air out of the bag.

Thawing

The best way to thaw meat is to remove it from the freezer and place in the refrigerator overnight or longer for bigger cuts. Slow thawing is recommended. Bacteria can form if you thaw at room temperatures.

It does not matter if your cut of meat is not totally thawed at cooking time. A little chill in meat can prevent it from losing its natural juices as well as some of its flavor and tenderness. If you cook meat that is slightly chilled, add approximately 20-30 minutes to the cooking time.

Meat Color

Meat does not necessarily always have a bright red color. Darker red coloration on the exterior layer is normal oxidation. (Note: If change of color is accompanied by odor or a tacky surface, meat may be spoiled).

When dealing with all types of ground meat, the interior meat may turn somewhat brown when exposed to air. It is still safe to eat.

Glossary

B

Bouquet Garni:

Aromatics tied in cheesecloth or tied in another type of “bag” such as celery or leeks to flavor soups and sauces. They may also contain thyme leafs, bay leaves, whole black peppercorn and parsley stems.

Blanch

To plunge food (usually vegetables and fruits) into boiling water briefly, then into cold water to stop the cooking process. Blanching is used to firm the flesh, to loosen skins (as with peaches and tomatoes) and to heighten and set color and flavor (as with vegetables before freezing).

Source: www. epicurious.com © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

C

Caramelize

To heat sugar until it liquefies and becomes a clear syrup ranging in color from golden to dark brown (from 320° to 350°F on a candy thermometer). Granulated or brown sugar can also be sprinkled on top of food and placed under a heat source, such as a broiler, until the sugar melts and caramelizes. A popular custard dessert finished in this fashion is CRÈME BRÛLÉE. Caramelized sugar is also referred to as burnt sugar.

Source: www. epicurious.com © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

D

Deglaze:

After food, (usually meat), has been sautéed and the food and excess fat removed from the pan, deglazing is done by heating a small amount of liquid or alcohol in the pan and stirring to loosen browned bits of food on the bottom. The liquid used is most often wine or stock. The resultant mixture often becomes a base for a sauce to accompany the food cooked in the pan.

Source: www. epicurious.com © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

Dredge:

Dredging is part of the standard breading procedure and it is done by dipping the product into flour and coating it evenly on all surfaces, making sure you shake off the excess. You want to avoid dredging foods in advance since it will cause the dry flour to become pasty. You should always perform this immediately before dipping the food into the egg or other liquid. The over-all purpose for dredging a food in flour is to create a dry surface to which the liquid can stick to.

R

Roux:

A mixture of flour and fat that, after being slowly cooked over low heat, is used to thicken mixtures such as soups and sauces. There are three classic roux: white (5-6 min); blond (5-6 min); and, brown (15-20 min). The color and flavor are determined by the length of time the mixture is cooked. Both white roux and blond roux are made with butter. The former is cooked just until it begins to turn beige and the latter until pale golden. Both are used to thicken cream and white sauces and light soups. The fuller-flavored brown roux can be made with butter, drippings or pork or beef fat. It's cooked to a deep golden brown and used for rich, dark soups and sauces. CAJUN and CREOLE dishes use a lard-based roux, which is cooked, (sometimes for almost an hour), until a beautiful mahogany brown. This dark nutty-flavored base is indispensable for specialties like GUMBO.

Source: www. epicurious.com © Copyright Barron's Educational Services, Inc. 1995 based on THE FOOD LOVER'S COMPANION, 2nd edition, by Sharon Tyler Herbst.

S

Standard Breading Procedure:

  1. Prep the wet food product to size.
  2. Dredge the food product in seasoned or unseasoned dry flour. Dredging is done by dipping the product into flour and coating it evenly on all surfaces, making sure you shake off the excess. You want to avoid dredging foods in advance since it will cause the dry flour to become pasty.
  3. Dip the flour dredged food product into an egg wash or other wet liquid and make sure that it is completely covered.
  4. Now immediately dust the egg washed food into dry crumbs. Most people tend to use either breadcrumbs or seasoned flour, but you can also use ground nuts, cereal, crackers and shredded fruit such as coconut.

Source: John & Wales University College of Culinary Arts. Culinary Fundamentals. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt Publishing Company, 2001.

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